Working Community Forests  

Ferns in Redwood Forest, photo credit: Greg Jirak  

Redwood
Forest
Foundation

       
About RFFI
Community Forestry
Usal Redwood Forest
Plant a Redwood Now
Bank of America
News & Newsletters
RFFI In The News
Who We Are
Contact RFFI
Join our mailing list
Join RFFI
Volunteer
Donate
Home
 
 

2016 Annual Update

Download
Annual Update

pdf icon in printer-friendly
pdf format (2.9 MB)

2016 RFFI Annual Update
Front cover photo: Jeff Becker




FREE TO GROW

You've seen the summer headline — "RFFI Registers One of the Largest Forest Carbon Projects in the U.S." What does that mean for the Usal Forest and RFFI?

Mark Welther, RFFI President & CEO
Mark Welther, RFFI President & CEO
It means that the forest is now more free to grow. By registering 3,166,000 carbon credits, RFFI has committed to not harvest a large portion of our trees and leave them standing for 100 years. That's a huge investment in the future health of a young forest so redwoods and habitat can mature and thrive again.

It also means RFFI is investing in a solution to climate change. According to Humboldt State University and University of Washington studies published this summer, redwood forests remove and store more carbon from the atmosphere per acre than any other forest on earth.

RFFI's carbon credits can now generate much needed revenue, most of which goes to pay down Usal's debt. At the same time, a portion of the proceeds can be applied toward forest management costs. In November 2015, RFFI assumed full management of the Usal Forest as a working community forest.

In this transition year, RFFI is developing a ten-year plan to integrate forest management with carbon sequestration, with the guidance of forestry consulting firm BBW & Associates. Our plans include:

  • Tree planting and thinning,
  • Surveys of Northern Spotted Owls and Coho salmon,
  • Security and fire protection, and
  • Road repairs.

Carbon credits by themselves, however, are only one forest management tool. They reduce the pressure on cutting trees to pay debt, allowing RFFI to balance sustainable harvest revenue with sales of carbon and other ecosystem services.

It is also important to note that carbon credits do not support RFFI's nonprofit programs - we still need your help.

In order for RFFI to be free to grow, your continued support is essential for the success of "Redwood Forests for Our Future." In the next year, we hope to raise $2.3 million to complete our priority projects, including:

  • The South Fork Eel and Usal Creek Coho Recovery Plans,
  • Herbicide-free forest management with a fire safety focus,
  • The Biochar project,
  • A future Redwood Community Nature Education Center.

As you make your year-end giving decisions, please consider making your most generous investment in RFFI. As partners, we can help redwoods and RFFI to be free to grow.
RFFI's Forest Stewardship Council certification mark North Coast Biochar logo Redwood Forest Foundation logo




Conservation Forestry in Usal Redwood Forest

by Richard Gienger, RFFI Board Member

Restoration and related art & sciences, community involvement, as well as providing local jobs, are basic to the mission of the Redwood Forest Foundation, Inc. (RFFI) - and they are manifested in the management of Usal Redwood Forest (URF). Please see the 2016 Restoration Map (below) prepared by Andrea Horvath that depicts the broad scope of restoration measures applied to the wide range of topography and conditions in our forest. The map also displays the 53,000 redwood seedlings that RFFI planted in the Usal Redwood Forest, many in riparian zones.

Leveraging public funding with matching funds, in most cases from RFFI, along with a number of valuable partners has made it possible to accomplish quite an array of work. Other projects are set to go or planned for the future. Key elements include the completed Coho Recovery Plan for the South Fork Eel tributaries in the URF, and the in-progress Coho Recovery Plan for the Usal Creek watershed. Important aspects are riparian redwood tree planting, instream habitat improvement by adding large logs to create structure, road removal and/or upgrades, shaded fuel breaks, and preserving Native American traditional acorn gathering places.

One of the most significant efforts has been the removal and/or upgrading of the entire Standley Creek Planning Watershed legacy road system, a six phase effort, the last phase of which will be finished in 2017. The grants and cost shares that funded the Standley Creek project total between $2 and $3 million, reflecting the high cost of addressing the damage caused by legacy roads in just one watershed. There are hundreds of similarly damaged watersheds on the North Coast, ten of which are in the URF.

This fall RFFI held a Restoration Plan Workshop and a Restoration Field Tour that were part of the 19th Annual Coho Confab. We are evaluating all the information and perspectives that emerged from those events, coupled with what we've learned over the last decade. As we implement our Stewardship and Management Plan for the Usal Redwood Forest, watershed and forest restoration will be integrated every step of the way.

Confluence of Indian and Anderson Creeks in Usal. Restoration of this site removed a colossal 1979 log jam that had blocked salmon and steelhead migration.
Confluence of Indian and Anderson Creeks in Usal. Restoration of this site removed
a colossal 1979 log jam that had blocked salmon and steelhead migration.




RFFI Supporters Enjoy Annual Meeting

by Heidi Knott Gundling, RFFI Board Member

On July 23, RFFI supporters gathered for the Annual Meeting in the Nelson Family Vineyards Redwood Grove just south of Ukiah.

Bill Snyder gave an update on RFFI's important transition to in-house forest management presently led by Stephen Smith, RPF, in consultation with BBW (Baldwin, Blomstrom & Wilkinson forestry consulting firm). Long time advisor Tom Tuchman of US Forest Capital described Usal's then pending carbon credit registration.

Richard Gienger presented RFFI's diverse and impressive restoration activities. Jack Dumbacher, PhD spoke about the competition for territory between endangered Northern Spotted Owls, native to struggling redwood forests, and the larger Barred Owls encroaching from the East. Jim Larson, Lee Rider, and Bill Snyder were recognized as Outstanding Volunteers for their exemplary service to RFFI. A tasty salmon and tri-tip barbeque wrapped up the well-attended event.

Kathy Moxon, RFFI Board Chair, addresses RFFI supporters at the Annual Meeting held at Nelson Family Vineyards on July 23, 2016
Kathy Moxon, RFFI Board Chair, addresses RFFI supporters at the
Annual Meeting held at Nelson Family Vineyards on July 23, 2016.




Plant a Redwood Now!
Youthful Philanthropy Continues

Plant a Redwood Now

Donations to RFFI's redwood reforestation program fund redwoods that are typically planted in honor of a donor's loved ones, family or clients. RFFI plants baby redwoods in redwood forest in California's Redwood region. Honorees or their families receive a lovely certificate with a customized message acknowledging the donor. Some of the most moving tributes have been inspired or supported by young people. Many remarkable young people are influencing the world of philanthropy.


Elizabeth Finley Broaddus. Friends and family memorialized Finley's love of the planet with a generous gift and moving tribute. Finley, a Virginia resident, had established her own foundation in support of environmental causes at the age of seventeen. Read about Finley's remarkable contribution to improving conditions on our planet.

Elizabeth Finley Broaddus founded FinleysGreenLeapForward. 'Please smile when you see nature in its glory, laugh at our own foolishness, and bear all things with strength and selflessness ~ and to pay her tribute, remember to care for this planet as she cared so much. In this way you will help to keep her with us.'
Elizabeth Finley Broaddus
founded FinleysGreenLeapForward.
"Please smile when you see nature in its glory, laugh at our own
foolishness, and bear all things with strength and selflessness
~ and to pay her tribute, remember to care for this planet as
she cared so much. In this way you will help to keep her with us."



William Tyler Huber. William's loving family immortalized William's commitment to improving the environment, love of trees -- redwoods, in particular -- with multiple gifts dedicating redwood trees in his honor. William's love of redwoods was fostered at Chatelherault Country Park in Hamilton, Scotland. His legacy supports numerous foundations that work for causes he believed in and actively supported. Read about William's charitable contributions and his concern for others.

William Tyler Huber in the forest that kindled his love of redwoods—Cadzow Glen, Hamilton, Scotland. Once a remarkably compassionate and thoughtful child, William's legacy supports human and environmental causes. 'The wind whispers his name ~ the branches wave in his honor.'
William Tyler Huber
in the forest that kindled his love
of redwoods—Cadzow Glen, Hamilton, Scotland. Once a
remarkably compassionate and thoughtful child, William's
legacy supports human and environmental causes.
"The wind whispers his name ~ the branches wave
in his honor."



Berkley Pelletier and his younger sisters. The Bedell family encourages philanthropy in their grand-children by having them participate in the family's Dreamcatcher Foundation. Four years ago, then ten-year old Berkley Pelletier chose to designate his $1,000 donation for planting redwoods via RFFI's Plant a Redwood program; he has since renewed the gift for three more years. Berk's youngest sister, who along with Berk actually helped to plant baby redwoods in Redwood Regional Park on Earth Day, became RFFI's youngest philanthropist at the age of four. Her 2014 gift supports 35 redwoods that are planted on a privately-owned preserve in Occidental, CA. With her second gift, she had 40 trees planted in a riparian zone along the Usal Creek in Usal Redwood Forest. In 2015, yet another young Pelletier joined the ranks of RFFI's young philanthropists. Berk's middle sister, a delightful 8 year old, made a donation to have 20 baby redwoods planted along with her sister's. Read more about the Pelletier children's significant contribution to redwood reforestation.

Berkley Pelletier donated his first gift, at the age of ten, through his family's Dreamcatcher Foundation. Berk personally helped to plant redwoods on Earth Day in Redwood Regional Park.
Berkley Pelletier
donated his first gift, at the age
of ten, through his family's Dreamcatcher
Foundation. Berk and his youngest sister
personally helped to plant redwoods on Earth Day
in Redwood Regional Park.



Silverwood Elementary School In early 2016, the students at Silverwood Elementary School in Concord, CA joined the ranks of RFFI's Young Philanthropists. The student council of this K-5 school, under the guidance of teachers, Shelley Harrison and Delrae Tillery, launched an initiative that the students named "Change for Change." The catchy slogan captured both the intent and method of the campaign.

Teacher Shelley Harrison
Teacher Shelley Harrison
  Teacher Delrae Tillery
Teacher Delrae Tillery

The young leaders spearheaded a campaign that collected change from students and faculty to be donated to RFFI, an organization that they felt was working to bring about positive change to the environment. Read more about Change for Change at Silverwood Elementary School.




RFFI's Newest "Plant a Redwood" Business Partner,
Cali-Roots, To Plant 800 Redwoods

The California Roots Music and Arts Festival (Cali-Roots) will showcase premier reggae and roots artists on Memorial Day weekend 2017 in Monterey, CA. Festival Co-Producer, Dan Sheehan, states, "The Cali-Roots movement is about developing and sustaining our community... When we learned that California's redwood forests help remove more carbon from the atmosphere - more than any other forest - we wanted to do what we could to help promote that movement. Teaming up with RFFI seemed like the perfect match." Learn more.

"RFFI leads the way in climate solutions... they follow the same grassroots growth that Cali-Roots has strived to achieve over the last eight years, making them a perfect partner to continue the growth of environmental sustainability." Two redwoods will be planted for each VIP Redwood Pass purchased - a total of 800 new redwood trees. Find out how your business or corporation can partner with RFFI to plant redwoods. Email morgan@rffi.org.




Matching Gifts
Double Your Donation

RFFI is approved to receive matching gifts from many employers, such as Microsoft, Bank of America, Google, Cisco and others. RFFI can help set up arrangements with your employer to match your donation.

Email morgan@rffi.org for help setting up a matching gift.

TOP MATCHING GIFTS COMPANIES
TOP MATCHING GIFTS COMPANIES





Thank You!




Offset Your Carbon Footprint
Why and How

Achieve Carbon Neutrality. Modern living generates greenhouse gas emissions, 'GHGs,' that trap heat in the atmosphere and cause climate change. We strive to reduce GHG emissions by driving fuel-efficient cars, insulating our homes, using solar power and public transportation. But our most valiant efforts can't eliminate all greenhouse gas emissions. This is where carbon offsets come in. They are designed to balance or mitigate GHG emissions.

What Can You Do to Offset Your Carbon Footprint? You can support projects that sequester carbon dioxide to offset your carbon footprint. Science shows that California's coastal redwood forests sequester more carbon than any forest on earth. You can make a donation to the Redwood Forest Foundation that will support the 50,000-acre Usal Redwood Forest, home of one of the largest forest carbon sequestration projects in the U.S. Your gift has other benefits; with it we will restore more streams, increase our habitat projects for spotted owls and endangered Coho salmon and plant more trees. Your gift supplements our carbon project that guarantees that RFFI will leave trees standing for 100 years or more.

Fight climate change.
Offset your carbon footprint

with a donation to RFFI.




2016 Restoration Map

2016 Restoration Map




Redwood Forest Foundation, Inc.
Board of Directors
  • Kathy Moxon, Chair
  • Candace Skarlatos, Treasurer
  • John Rogers, Secretary
  • Mike Balok
  • Richard Gienger
  • Greg Giusti (ex-officio)
  • Heidi Knott Gundling
  • Kendall Smith
  • Bill Snyder




Credits:
Front Cover Photo: Jeff Becker
Back Cover: Usal Forest Map: Andrea Horvath
Other Photos: Fari Pour Ansari, Richard Gienger




facebook
Facebook

pinterest
Pinterest

instagram
Instagram

linkedin
Linkedin




 
Redwood Bark

Home  -  FAQ  -  Credits  -  Search/SiteMap

© 2004-2016 Redwood Forest Foundation